Entries - E

ed or -t?

The following always end in -ed:

learned, dreamed, spelled, smelled

The following always ends in -t 

leapt

The following end in -ed for the simple past, and past participle

burned, spoiled, spilled

but in -t when used as an adjective  

burnt, spoilt, spilt

grammar

electromagnet

No hyphen.

spelling, style

electron

A stable subatomic particle with a charge of negative electricity, found in all atoms and acting as the primary carrier of electricity in solids.

Electrons belong to a class of particles called leptons.

physics

electronvolt

One word. Or shorten to eV.

style

elementary particle

Another term for fundamental particle. "Fundamental particle" is preferable – there is nothing elementary about the complex interactions of subatomic particles.

physics

elements

Lower case

ALICE detected lead-proton collisions. 

Milk contains lots of calcium.

Where appropriate, give the chemical symbol in brackets. 

Superconducting dipole magnets on the Large Hadron Collider are made from niobium-titanium (NbTi) coils.

style

ellipsis

Use the ellipsis character (… ) in quoted material if you need to show that words have been omitted from the middle of the original quote. In HTML5, it is written: …

The ellipsis should always be followed by a space.

punctuation, style

email

No hyphen. But e-commerce, e-book.

style

embedding video

See video.

style

enquiring

With an "e".

Showing an interest in learning new things:

CERN is a place for enquiring minds. 

Not inquiring.

style

entitled

Don't use it. Use titled instead.

style

Euro (€)

See Currencies

style

event

An "event" is what happens after a collision: particles decay, form tracks and are detected.

See collision or event?.

physics, style

event or collision?

See collision or event?.

style

exclamation marks

Avoid using them. If the statement is surprising or exciting, it will be clear to the reader without the need for an exclamation mark.

In particular, avoid multiple exclamation marks e.g.:

…this year the Wildcats are here and full of determination, as never before!!!!

 

punctuation, style

experiments

Use capitals for the names of experiments (ATLAS, ALICE, NA62, CLOUD etc) except for: LHCb, LHCh and n_TOF (but note AEGIS is all caps).

Because CERN experiments can involve thousands of people working across laboratories and countries, there is considerable overlap between the concept of an experiment, research team or collaboration. 

Be careful how you use these terms - think how inclusive the term needs to be.

style

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